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and of the opposition. >> brown: then, we update the growing unrest in egypt where the islamist-dominated assembly fast-tracked a vote on a new constitution. >> suarez: we continue our conversations with newly-elected senators. tonight, arizona republican, jeff flake. >> >> we're at a point on the fiscal issues where we have to reach an agreement and perhaps as we do so that will start the stage for the other areas as well. >> brown: fred de sam lazaro has the story of a minnesota non- profit that celebrates diversity and the power of dance. >> they're one of the few companies that within their own work spans so many kinds of different style, from classical ballet to modern danceo contemporary performance to urban dance. >> suarez: and we look at college sports teams, moving from conference to conference, playing a game of musical chairs where the end goal is more money from lucrative tv contracts. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p.
. egypt's president is a leader of the muslim brotherhood. the assassination will be seen as a calculated and dangerous insult. egypt strongly condemns what israel is doing in gaza. this is an unacceptable act, and we deeply condemn it. >> what has changed since the war? the west and israel have lost their most reliable friend, and egypt's president mubarak. they saw him as an indispensable part of the solution at times like this. >> heightened tensions in the middle east tonight. in other news from around the world, the united nations secretary general ban ki moon has set a report on the failure to attack civilians. -- has said a report on the failure to attack civilians will have a profound impact. in iraq, simultaneous car bomb attacks across the country have killed at least 17 people. dozens were injured. the attack struck baghdad and other cities. it is not clear if the attacks are the work of one group. across europe, tens ofhousands have taken to the streets in protest of rising unemployment and government austerity measures. workers in spain, portugal, greece, and italy went out o
're waaching fox 45 good day baltimore. >> thousands of christians are leaving egypt in fear. >> it is an exitous of biblical proportions just over the last 12 months. >> as the shift in political power favors is lack an islam and their radical forms. >> american christians are very concerned about their brothers and sisters in christ here in egypt. what should they do? >> the exitous of christians from egypt electiio day has arrived. the turnouu in marylann and down. ttnighh on fox 45 news at fivee. >> i was too young to understand what to do. >> lee: he went face to face with a demon, and got an offer he couldn't refuse.
prime minister benjamin netanyahu before jetting to cairo for talks with the president of egypt, mohammad morsi. the urgency underscored by the carnage in benghazi. rockets are lobbying back and forth. israeli air attacks killing 27 more palestinians bringing the death toll to 137 just in the last week. >> now a spokesman for hamas sounded cautiously optimistic that a cease-fire could be at hand telling cnn we are close, we are on the edge. cnn has reporters blanketing the region to bring you the most comprehensive coverage of this crisis in gaza. fred pleitgen is in ashkelon, ben wedemans in gaza city. ben wedeman, good morning, set the scene for me. >> reporter: yes, brooke, it was a noisezy night and we saw intense bombardment just behind where i'm standing. that was proceeded by increasing sort of mounting reports that a cease-fire was about to be announced or a period of calm. but it appears that there were problems within the israeli government that prime minister benjamin netanyahu and his foreign minister lieberman didn't see eye to eye with the defense minister who was
, up into egypt across the sinai peninsula into the tunnels and into the gaza strip. jenna: is egypt complicit in this? >> that is a big question. and i think it's a question that very few in the media have bothered to ask. for the last several months the government of mohammed morsi in egypt has really been seen the responsible party for hamas. it was assumed that morsi had brought hamas under his wing and he was insuring that there would be calm. all of a sudden we find that hamas has these rockets smuggled into their territory likely through egyptian smuggling routes. the question is, what's egypt irrelevant or complicit. either way this looks horrible for the egyptians. jenna: of the rockets that were smuggled in, to the best of our knowledge and a lot of this depends upon intelligence that maybe we don't have access to, are all the robots smuggled in the longer-range robots, have they been destroyed by israel or are there more out there? >> we've seen israeli officials, including the ambassador here in washington, michael oren say that more than 90% of the rockets they are looki
by egypt, turkey and qatari officials. israeli defense forces targeted a media building in gaza, aiming at four senior hamas operatives they believed were inside. and two people died. it is not clear if they were the ones designated as the hamas targets. hamas, which grew out of the muslim brotherhood, seized in our gaza in 2007. since then, the group has become increasingly militarized. the death toll stands at 100 in gaza including women and children. and three in israel. any others have been wounded on both sides. israel credits its anti-missional defense system known as the iron dome funded by the united states for its low number of deaths. cnn's frederick platkin was live when the system intercepted a rocket midair. >> there, over in the sky, you probably won't be able to see it here, there is an interceptor missile taking off now. that's the iron dome interceptor. if you saw the flash in the sky, that was a rocket coming out of gaudia that was just intercepted right now. >> despite back and forth rocket and missile launches, there is a behind the scenes optimism that a cease-fire
egypt's president, trying to broker a truce. minutes ago he declared that israel will soon halt its air strikes on gaza. along egypt's border with gaza, reza sayeh. tell us more. >> reporter: we don't want to jump to conclusions. we should be very cautious. there are growing signs from where we are standing in egypt that there could a closing in on a truce or cease fire. latest sign is a statement made by egyptian president mohamed morsi, according to state tv. he said that, quote, israeli gra aggression would end on tuesday. that, of course, is today. that's consistent with similar statements we've heard from other officials late last night. we spoke with a senior egyptian official and he told us he's optimistic that in the next 24 hours there would be a cease fire. hamas officials are being even more specific. senior hamas official telling cnn that israel has agreed to the general terms but rejected the timing. hamas conditions, according to an official, are this. stop the air operation, air assaults and want the ground crossings, blockades to be opened up immediately. according to th
to hear, egypt's president mohamed morsi suggesting progress in attempts at brokering a cease-fire. and backing hamas, released a statement saying, the travesty of the israel aggression on gaza will end in a few hours. we're going to get to the details of all of this and the apparent pause in fighting in just a moment. but first, we want to look at the united states role and all the various players that are involved in this. and in about an hour, secretary of state hillary clinton is to meet with israel prime minister benjamin netanyahu. tomorrow, she is scheduled to meet with the palestinian authority. mahmoud abbas. he's in the west bank. that's on the opposite side of israel from gaza. he's going to be talking -- talking to the palestinian authority, it is a way really to communicate with hamas. now, clinton cannot speak with hamas directly because the united states considers it a terrorist group. so by talking to palestinians she can reach hamas. talking to egypt's president is going to be her last stop. as we see here. so by talking to egypt, that's another way for her to
stock of egypt and israel and had a set time and the lord will do this thing in the land and the lord did this thing the next day and all the life stock of egypt died but the life stock of children of israel not one died and the pharaoh went and not one of the israelites was died and the lord said to moses take for yourself and handful of ashes from a furnace and let moses scatter towards the heavens and in the sight of pharaoh it and become fine dust in egypt and boils that break out on man and beast and all the land of egypt. >> thanks. next speaker. >> yes, i am born and raised in san francisco. i have been been back for a while. i am asking some probably questions. i didn't hear if you're allowed to get a response. for instance why can't citizens pull items from the consent agenda? in el dorado county in tal hoe citizens can pull and the amount of time is different than what you stated and i took the bus to get here and all the people who may have been spread out around the park -- i call it plaza park were kind of more angry than ever on turk street. they have no place to
in the past two days. three died yesterday from rocket fire. egypt dispatched its prime minister to gaza to show support for the palestinian people and hamas today. he met with hamas's prime minister about the casualties on the ground. he visited a hospital, showed emotion over the death of a 1-year-old boy. he also read a verse from the koran and later egypt's president mohammed morsi gave a fiery speech in support of the palestinian people on state tv. listen. >> we support the people of gaza. what hurts them, hurts us. >> hate and violence between the israelis and palestinians was sparked by this. israel's assassination of hamas's military chief on wednesday. an assassination that israel called necessary because of increased rocket attacks from gaza into israel the last several weeks. our senior international correspondent ben wiederman has been covering the middle east. you've been covering it for decades now. when you see israel moving hundreds of troops to the border of israel and gaza and saying it's going to call up 16,000 more reservists, what does that sound like they're prepar
are under way in cairo. egypt knows without a truce the conflict could spread throughout the area. both sides have conditions the leader said israel must stop killing its leaders and give palestinians more freedom to travel and import goods. israeli prime minister netanyahu, according to aides, also wanted a negotiated settlement. first, a cease-fire, then more talking. the palestinian negotiator visited gaza with a message from the cairo talks. >> yes, there is a possibility that there are serious negotiations. but israel will have to give up its attempt to cow us and look like it is a surrender. >> reporter: what are they asking from the palestinian side? >> they start with -- a call for surrender, i mean, you stop, you deliver your weapons and then we'll see what to do. >> reporter: a truce is in the works, but until that happens gaza remains under attack. richard engel, nbc news, gaza. >>> this is martin fletcher in southern israel where everyone is desperate to know, ground invasion of gaza or truce? officials say it is 50/50, leaving three and a half million israelis at the mercy
to sit down with egypt's president. and it's really important for secretary clinton to do her best to try to broker some kind of peace deal along with the rest of the international community. they are very concerned about the violence spilling into other areas of the region and we know right now it's very volatile there not only in what's happening in israel and in gaza but also in syria and egypt and in lebanon, frank. >> now, the u.s. government has a strong stand against hamas. so who will meet with the hamas leaders to broker the peace deal? >> reporter: that's egypt's president right now. mohamed morsi has been meeting with hamas. of course, the united states won't sit down with hamas leaders because they have not renounced terrorism. so that complicates the situation even further. but egypt has stepped up to try to broker this peace deal. there was word that there would be an announcement of some type of temporary truce a 24-hour cooling-off period this afternoon. we haven't heard anything yet. but the international community scrambling right now at this hour to try to find a way to
war and with elections they decided enough for now. >> this is a critical moment for the region. egypt posing new government is assuming the responsibility and leadership that has long made this country's " -- a cornerstone of regional stability and peace. >> the site of weapons supplied by the u.s. bombing arabs once again means that too much american craze is something that no leader in the american -- and no leader in the arab east wants right now. this morning as negotiations reached a critical stage, they were burying the night's dead. egypt is struggling to recreate itself. >> there has been a lot of cross border violence. there is no reason to oppose a new one either. not unless there is a change. >> @ gaudette's main hospital there was no -- more support from the east. libyans in turkey helping hamas believe that history is on its side. >> eight days have helped the hands of the zionist to submit to history. >> many more palestinians and israelis have been killed and wounded. death and injuries feel the same on either side. making a cease-fire in a conflict this bitter, which h
president of egypt, mohamed morsi. the question now, is will it hold? will the people of the region get some peace? we have more on both sides of the conflict. we get more from our chief correspondent andrea mitchell, good evening. >> reporter: good evening, kate, the cease-fire was brokered under pressure from president obama, but wouldn't have happened without egypt's new islamic president, mohamed morsi, playing a key role. the cease-fire came after another night of punishing air strikes against gaza. and the first bus bombing in tel aviv in eight years. >> the united states welcomes the agreement today for a cease-fire in gaza, the rocket attacks must end to bring a broader, calm return. >> reporter: the agreement calls for israel to stop air strikes and hamas to stop rocket attacks. if that holds for 24 hours, they will talk about border contrs on gaza, and promise no more targeting of hamas leaders. israeli ground troops are mobilized, if there are attacks >> now, i realize that there are citizens who expect a harder military action, and we may very well need to do that. but at the pre
thing in egypt. mubarak left, the pakistani egypt are different stories. the military both countries controls upwards of 40% of the country directly and the rest is a small group of elites. so that is what is the lack of big trees falling in creating the new. that gets back to your gm question. you need to have capabilities to repurpose what is released with something dies. when something old false. but there has not been enough of that in a place like pakistan or in egypt. china and egypt is a totally different sorry. >> host: philip auerswald come what do teacher at george mason? >> guest: i teach economics and social lunch premiership. i would just use regular entrepreneurship. i'm a believer in lunch premiership is a transformative force in society. social entrepreneurship of coors is about thinking how to address public challenges in miniature for new rail manner, potentially envision new ventures, new pathways to make the most of that. so a lot of folks in this book you may save our social lunch burners. it's a great teaching here. i love this environment. i've got a colleague,
with deep divisions between member states. >> violent protests across egypt a day after president morsi assumes new sweeping powers. >> what is at stake in the battle for control of congress? we have a full report. the eu summit has ended without any agreement on the union's next seven-year budget, but top officials in brussels say they are confident a deal will be reached early next year. >> hours of talks failed to bridge big gaps between richer countries and those that rely most on eu funding. be contributors like britain, the netherlands, and sweden want spending bold back across the board -- rolled back across the board. >> european leaders were skeptical going into negotiations, so it was no surprise when ministers called off talks without a working budget. >> everyone brought their own goals to the table, and you know germany's position, but we are still focused on working toward a budget everyone can agree to. >> that means winning over england. prime minister david cameron has promised to veto any deal that fails to cut spending, and he has found a supporter in the dutch leader
clashed in egypt in cairo. with the parliament gone, the new leader can create pass and oversee new laws. >> reporter: protesters in egypt set fire to one headquarters of the muslim brotherhood and threw rocks at a another. hundreds gathered in cairo's square after nightfall. there were thousands more earlier in the day. and confrontation with riot police. the officers fired tear gas at the group injuring a few of the protesters. the violence was triggered after egypt's granted himself sweeping new powers, making him immune to oversight. a spokesperson said that theder clauges raised concern -- declarations for egypt egipans -- egyptians and the international community. he made the move thursday, a day after receiving worldwide accolades for mediating a ceasefire between hamas and israel. these are the most widespread protests since he came in power in june following the country's first election. >>> watch out. the big time tumble that led to a hug from a big baby. >>> it's good for the soul. >> and yes, there's more to the season than just shopping. the woman that will spend every frid
the crisis in egypt or push that country into further chaos. that is one of our big stories. we're glad you're with us. i'm jenna lee. jon:. i'm jon scott. the first elected leader, president mohammed morsi expected to come face-to-face with senior judges in egypt who say his power grab has gone too far. there are indications that the both side are trying to find some middle ground. morsi's maneuver unleased a rage of protests that continues to rage across the country. meanwhile the u.s. embassy in cairo says there are sporadic clashes between protesters and police near its entrance. we're told some rocks landed inside the walls of that huge compound. embassy officials say there is no indication they are the target. egypt wields enormous influence in the middle east peac process. that power demonstrated by brokering the cease-fire between is rainfall and hamas. steve care began streaming live too cairo with the latest developments right now. steve? >> reporter: jon, this is a key meeting between egypt's president and the chief justices in cairo. already there are hints from the president's
to egypt. >> there have been more clashes in the egyptian capital, cairo, against what is viewed as a power grab by president morsi. >> thousands of people have converged on tahrir square today as part of a nationwide protest called by opponents of the president's. >> the spirit of the arab spring has returned to cairo. tens of thousands of egyptians have once again taken to tahrir square of the president's decree giving him sweeping new powers. he has been decried as a power- hungry activists and executioner of the egyptian revolution. >> the supreme leader of the muslim brotherhood is the true leader of egypt. >> this was the biggest protest organized by opponents of the muslim brotherhood since morsi took office. the muslim brotherhood cancel the protest in support of the president to stave off further clashes, but the debate between a secular and islamic egypt continues. >> the muslim brothers want islam as a country. that is their agenda. they are not hiding it. it is not as though they are doing it suddenly or secretly. this is their declared agenda. >> tensions are running high, and
christian families in egypt. we'll tell you who is helping them survive and giving them hope for the future. christians in america are giving thanks to god for their spiritual heritage. hello, everyone. i'm wendy griffith. george thomas is on assignment. believers are celebrating the fact that america was founded as a christian nation. not too long ago, archeologists at jamestown, virginia, discovered the original church, built in 1608 as james fort. it's the place where pok pok pokehontus married. and it is the place of america's history. >> if you kill him, you'll have to kill me, too. >> stand back. >> i won't. >> pok pokehontus is legendary. smith claimed the daughter of chief palatan came to his rescue, after he had been taken prisoner by her father's men. this native american heroin would later marry another jamestown columnist, john roth. just where that marriage took place has been a mystery, that is until now. nearly 400 years after that historic wedding. where we're standing right now, this is where pokehontus and john roth would have gotten married? >> absolutely. >> reporter: he
that egypt is fast becoming an islamic state. >> hosni mubarak never divided the egyptian people. now, there is president morsi, and we do not know if he is the president of egypt or the president of the muslim brotherhood. >> islamists who dominate the assembly have already answered that question -- the body signed off on all 234 articles of the constitution, which is based upon the principles of sharia or islamic law. the constitution maintains sharia as the main source of legislation. it also gives women no guarantee of equal rights, since the rights must conform with sharia. religious leaders will also be able to directly influence egyptian legislation in the future. secular and christian representatives boycotted the vote. they had already withdrawn from the assembly weeks ago. in a television interview, morsi again tried to appease the opposition forces. he said the sweeping forces to granted himself last week will only remain until a constitution goes into effect, but that is not enough for his opponents who have vowed to keep on protesting. >> those protests have been growing
room" starts now. >>> happening now, police fire tear gas as demonstrations in egypt turn violent. angry protesters accuse egypt's president of betraying the revolution. and in the word of one critic, making himself a pharoah. what happened before and after u.s. navy s.e.a.l.s. did in the moments before killing osama bin laden. >>> wolf blitzer's off today. i'm joe johns. you're in "the situation room." >>> we begin with today's astonishing show of fury in egypt. within the past hour egyptian authorities tear gassed protesters in cairo's tahrir square. angry demonstrators packed the square today denouncing egyptian president mohamed morsi as a dictator and accusing him of a power grab. cnn's reza sayah is in cairo. reza, what's it look like now? >> reporter: joe, it is 11:00 p.m. cairo time. these demonstrators started gathering around in tahrir square about 1:00 p.m. local time. that means they've been going strong for about ten hours. many thought maybe egyptians were worn out, tired of demonstrating after the 2011 revolution, but if you look at tahrir square today, if you look
protests throughout the muslim world today after friday prayers came to an end. in egypt, crowds in cairo and alexandria waved palestinian flags and chanted anti-israeli slogans. thousands of people also turned out in yemen to denounce the israeli offensive. and in turkey, a one-time israeli ally, people in istanbul called for the death of the jewish state. >> brown: and for more on the conflict, we are joined by hisham melham, washington bureau chief for al- arabiya; and dan schueftan is director of national security studies center at the university of haifa. gentlemen, one thing i think a lot of people, myself included are wondering how did this flare-up seemingly so quickly. dan schueftan. >> well, since hamas took over we had for a while a thoand rockets per year, then came israeli escalation and-- and it went down to a small number of rockets every year, last year again we came to about a thousand rockets against israel. and this intensified in recent weeks to the point where israel had to take action. israel was saying for about two weeks, i mean people here were dealing with the el
after his body was kissed by egypt's prime minister during a tour of a gaza hospital. we need to warn you about the video you're about to see. it's heartbreaking and may be considered disturbing to many of our viewers. for our report, cnn visited the child's home that neighbors said had been bombed five hours previously. neighbors and family members told cnn they heard an aircraft before the explosion. the israeli military told cnn today it did not carry out any air strikes at the time of the child's death. the israeli defense force says it stopped attacks because of the visit of egypt's prime minister, raising questions about what cause the fatal blast. among the other possibilities, the misfire of an hamas rocket intended for israel. cnn's crew in gaza said it saw two rockets passing overhead, apparently fired not far from where the boy lived. >>> since the air strikes began wednesday, at least 65 palestinians and 3 israelis have been killed and neither side is showing any signs of backing down. cnn's senior international correspondent sarah sidner is in gaza city right now. sara, w
's tahrir square and elsewhere in egypt today, sparked when president mohamed morsi granted himself broad new powers. good evening. i'm jeffrey brown. >> suarez: and i'm ray suarez. on the newshour tonight, we have the latest on the widespread demonstrations, and assess what's behind the egyptian leader's moves. >> brown: then, the death toll in syria's 20-month war has climbed past 40,000, according to a human rights group. we get an update from margaret warner, reporting from the turkish border. >> suarez: we continue our conversations with newly-elected senators. judy woodruff talks with virginia democrat tim kaine. >> i intend to hit the ground on january 3 very much running. > running. we can make progress quickly if we listen to each other and find those points of common ground they think do exist. >> brown: mark shields and david brooks analyze the weeks news. >> suarez: spencer michels has the story of a growing crackdown on dissidents and journalists in iran. >> brown: and we close with poet jennifer fitzgerald on hurricane sandy's destructive path through her home town of staten
center stage in protests in egypt. the president seizes more power, undermining the country's democratic reform. the turmoil follows a still fragile cease-fire in gaza as the middle east takes another volatile turn. >>> at home, white house critics press for more answers about what went wrong in libya, and whether officials were truthful with the public. >> i relied solely and squarely on the information provided to me by the intelligence community. i made clear that the information was preliminary. >>> my guests this morning weigh in. chairman of the armed services committee carl levin. and chairman of the house homeland security committee, new york republican peter king. then where does america stand on the verge of a second obama term in office? the economy, the fiscal cliff talks, the president's priorities in the next four years. our roundtable is here. david brooks of "the new york times." msnbc's reverend al sharpton. former ceo of hewlett-packard carly fiorina >> historian and film maker ken burns. and nbc chief foreign affairs correspondent andrea mitchell. and we'l
. more clashes in egypt over the weekend as police use tear gas this morning to disburse protesters in cairo. i want to start there. we have "new york times" columnist david brooks and our own andrea mitchell. andrea, this is because president morsi has seized power, a day after brokering a cease-fire between israel and hamas, he is now consolidating power. how worry side the administration about it? >> very worried, but they are very, very cautious because he is their new point of leverage really with hamas. he is the future, they thought, of trying to negotiate something and revive the israeli-palestinian talks. and now suddenly he seizes power. he was looking for this opportunity. he is threatened by the judiciary and the other mubarak forces who have, he believes, stopped the constitutional process and stymied that. but for him to do this now, at his point of greatest authority, puts the administration in a bind. and it's unclear how this is going to resolve. >> david brooks, there's a larger strategic question. there's egypt, gaza, syria, iran. there's a president's second term
's always a pleasure. thank you very much. >> thank you. >>> and up next, protests in egypt and the turnover on the president's foreign policy team. we'll talk to dennis ross. >>> and still ahead, former bush national security adviser steven hadley, plus our correspondents in the field. this is "andrea mitchell reports" only on msnbc. sometimes what we suffer from is bigger than we think ... like the flu. with aches, fever and chills- the flu's a really big deal. so why treat it like it's a little cold? there's something that works differently than over-the-counter remedies. prescription tamiflu attacks the flu virus at its source. so don't wait. call your doctor right away. tamiflu is prescription medicine for treating the flu in adults and children one year and older whose flu symptoms started within the last two days. before taking tamiflu tell your doctor if you're pregnant, nursing. have serious health conditions, or take other medicines. if you develop an allergic reaction, a severe rash, or signs of unusual behavior, stop taking tamiflu and call your doctor immediately. children and a
" tonight, egypt on edge. is a new dictatorship on the horizon? tonight, president morsi clarified, but really largely stood by his decision to grant himself sweeping powers. including freedom from judicial review for what he's calling presidential decisions. the announcement was made today after morsi met with members of egypt's judicial body, which has been very critical of his decision. and u.s. officials who just days ago were heaping praise on the new egyptian leader for his role in initiating a cease-fire between israel and hamas, well, now when he took all these powers away from judges that reign supreme, they're in a tough spot. >> we have some concerns about the decisions and declarations announced on november 22nd. democracy depends on strong institutions and the important checks and balances that provide accountability. >> so, today, there were nationwide protests continuing in egypt and a million person march of anti morsi protesters is scheduled for tomorrow in tahrir square. the very spot where the revolution that cleared the way for morsi's presidency was born. now,
from egypt. thousands of protesters gathered in tahrir square. 6:15 at night there, many have been chanting step down in reaction to the decree issue by egypt's new president that grants him absolute power. the sixth straight day of protest after morsi issued his decree last thursday. earlier today, the protest turning violent on a street near tahrir square. at least three protesters have been killed since the weekend. nbc live from cairo. and the crowd in tahrir square has been growing, building over the past hours. explain what we're seeing now. >> reporter: well, behind me, probably tens of thousands of egyptians have gathered, been here since the early hours of the morning. in fact, some have been camped out for the past six days. many songs, chants, slogans reminiscent of two years ago, calling on the same things they did two years ago, which is for the president of egypt to step down. they've changed the name, obviously, to reflect egypt's new islamist president. you mentioned that incident today with the tear gas and the police, that took place outside the u.s. embassy. riot
. there has been talk of a possible cease-fire in egypt. the prime minister of israel issued a statement today, saying israel was ready to escalate this operation, significantly, meaningesquively, there are 24 hours left for a cease-fire to be negotiated or we have tanks rolling across the hills and into the gaza strip. >> eric: just an astounding graphic demitration. you mentioned the peace talks, and an unidentified israeli official has ark rifed in cairo to talk with the egyptians. any sense that the clock is ticking, 24 hours, if a truce can be obtained before the tanks go rolling over the border. >> reporter: i did check with a source inside egypt who confirmed that israeli being on the ground. that's significant. israelis don't tend anyone to the peace talks unless they happening there is a chance of a real cease-fire. you have the egyptians brokering, you have the turkish prime minister and his representatives and people from qatar, who have given hamas a lot of money, you have leaders of hamas inside the gaza strip, firing the rockets out. they are all around a table. they are trying t
by the united states and instead they find egypt, turkey, other countries of the region, are playing a much more proactive role in the crisis. >> hillary clinton will be meeting with mahmoud abbas, with the palestinian authority, with fatah in the west bank. a lot of observers say that's a face-saving move to help him out. sort of been sidelined in all of this, who comes out in the group stronger? does hamas emerge stronger no matter what happens? what does that mean moving forward for u.s. relations with pat stillian groups? the u.s. doesn't recognize hamas. been trying to deal with the palestinian authority. but if they have lost power, what does that mean moving forward to getting a longer term peace deal? >> to be honest, i don't think either palestinian faction comes out ahead the palestinian people have known six decades of futility. never been able to formulate what they need to do with their own lives. never have diplomatic answers. so i think now the hamas people will have their moment in the sun. there will be people that will come to them. visitors from afar. the turks will come in, a
to create a moral equivalency. i think a ground war is obviously going to test where is egypt, where is turkey. we know where iran is. they are arming the hamas, missiles or a lot of them seem to come out of iran. in essence, it seems to me that something pro joked by iran and encouraged by egypt and turkey by immediately taking the side of hamas which is extraordinary. >> greta: so, with hamas in order to get them to step down from its firing rockets into israel and doing provocative, take at hamas. why in the world they are going reach with truce. they are consumed with hatred toward israel. they were very tight and close to iran. today they identified six people who they felt were conspiring with the israelis. they executed them and dragged one body through the streets. they used civilians as shields. where in the world is if i do strike a temporary deal, why in the world would you ever think it would stick or hold? >> you would have to be totally unrealistic. the secretary-general's comments everybody should show restraint is absurd. if somebody lobbed 130 bombs on new york we wo
need to help the libyans train a national army. they were willing to pay for it. in egypt we really led from behind. this idea of having a hands off policy toward syria is about to blochb the whole region up. the war is coming to israel. it's affecting turkey and other places. so i believe that if they don't lead from the front that syria and iran are going to coming together and we're going to have a major conflict in the mideast. >> what was the best thing we got out the arab spring so far? >> the fact is authoritarian regimes have been overthrown the likelihood they will simply be replaced by other authoritarian regimes or some in some cases, yemen and libya qualify here the countries will descend into anarchy. parts will be controlled by al-qaeda and quote, unquote, success of the government controls very little territory. i think overall the arab spring has not brought democracy and light to middle east. it has brought a deterioration of the security situation and deterioration of the american interests and those of our friends and allies like israel and arab states. >> greta: ther
. and the interesting thing again here, which didn't happen before, is that egypt, the leading player in getting this cease-fire, is a guarantor of the cease-fire. that was something that israel wanted and hamas wanted as well. but israel and israeli officials told me in jerusalem they didn't want to go into another nebulas cease-fire. that, i think, is a bit of a change as well. >> christiane amanpour, appreciate talking to you tonight. thank you. >>> prime minister netanyahu warned there could be additional military action if the cease-fire does not lead to long-term security. u.n. secretary general ban ki-moon says a broader cease-fire, long-term solutions are necessary to address the underlying causes of conflict. joining me now live is michael orr, israeli ambassador to the united states. we've heard from a lot of israelis tonight, particularly in the border regions along the gaza border who are very concerned and very doubtful about hamas's ability long term to maintain the cease-fire, to live up to the agreement and to make progress on these agreements. how can you guarantee that hamas wi
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